Social-Imperialist China Praises Lee Kuan Yew

The then Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping with Lee Kuan Yew in Beijing on August 7, 2008 (REN HAIXIA)

The following article appeared in Beijing Review on April 2, 2015. It praises capitalist oligarch Lee Kuan Yew of Singapore as a great man and his government and economy as a democratic model for developing countries, smeared only by Westerners. It is just another example of the degeneration of China and of the publication, which went from writing articles like “Imperialist Plunder — Biggest Obstacle to the Economic Growth of ‘Underdeveloped’ Countries” in 1965 to praising the monopoly capitalist dictatorial model for other countries to emulate. I posted this article on social media when it first came out. It was largely ignored by supporters of the modern Chinese social-imperialist state, some of which must think it is entirely reasonable for an ostensibly communist publication to recommend that other countries follow the governing style of a deceased bourgeois autocrat. I however, do not.

– E.S.

Lee Kuan Yew’s China Connections

Remembering a wise friend of the Chinese people

By Yu Lintao

Singapore’s founding father Lee Kuan Yew died on March 23 at the age of 91, triggering an outpouring of grief from its citizens and many others around the world. Under Lee’s leadership, Singapore made a stunning transformation from a poor island country to one of the most developed nations within just one generation.

The rapid development of Singapore is well connected with its governance model which was mainly created by Lee–known today as “the Singapore model.” The political model draws on Western political systems without merely copying them. Despite being underplayed by some Western theorists as pseudo-democracy, the Singapore model has shown a clear record as a strong governance style. It ensures the Singaporean Government’s high efficiency, incorruptibility and vitality which lead the country to attain an economic leap forward.

Lee’s political model has not only benefited the development of his own country but also become a model for many countries striving to build a first-world economy. The model indicates that the Western way of governance is not the only way leading to a country’s prosperity and its people’s wellbeing.

In a message posted on the website of the State Council of China, Premier Li Keqiang stated that “Mr Lee Kuan Yew had worked together with the pioneering generation of Chinese leaders in opening the gate for the friendly cooperation between China and Singapore ? His contributions to the China-Singapore relations and China’s reform and opening up will surely be marked by history.”

In a message of condolences to Singapore’s President Tony Tan Keng Yam over the passing away of Lee, Chinese President Xi Jinping hailed Lee as an old friend of the Chinese people and the founder, pioneer and promoter of China-Singapore relations.

Lee was regarded as the founder of close Sino-Singaporean relations. He was one of the few world leaders who met with all five of China’s top leaders and visited China as many as 33 times since his first visit in 1976.

As a visionary politician, Lee seized the momentous opportunity of China’s reform and opening up, advanced Sino-Singaporean cooperation to promote the further development of his country.

In the early phase of China’s reform and opening up, Lee helped China attract investment from overseas businessmen in Southeast Asia, and he also made Singaporean participation in and support for China’s transformation a long-term policy. In the meantime, Lee cemented Singapore’s position in the global economy alongside China’s meteoric rise.

Since the establishment of their official relations in 1990, the bilateral trade between China and Singapore grew from $2.83 billion in 1990 to $91.43 billion in 2013. China has become the largest trading partner of Singapore while Singapore is the 11th largest trading partner of China.

Lee’s proposed Suzhou Industrial Park, the largest cooperative project between China and Singapore, was inaugurated in 1994 in east China’s Jiangsu Province, creating an icon of China-Singapore cooperation. It has also served as a model for China’s economic cooperation with other foreign countries.

The late Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping with Lee Kuan Yew in Beijing in the 1980s (CNS)

The late Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping with Lee Kuan Yew in Beijing in the 1980s (CNS)

The then Chinese President Jiang Zemin with Lee Kuan Yew in Beijing on June 13, 2000 (MAO JIANJUN)

The then Chinese President Jiang Zemin with Lee Kuan Yew in Beijing on June 13, 2000 (MAO JIANJUN)

The then Chinese President Hu Jintao with Lee Kuan Yew in Beijing on June 19, 2004 (MAO JIANJUN)

The then Chinese President Hu Jintao with Lee Kuan Yew in Beijing on June 19, 2004 (MAO JIANJUN)

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